Episode 16: Circadian Rhythm & Jet Lag; Exercise and Appetite

We’ll start this episode by talking about clocks, but not the type of clock that ticks away on your wall. Instead, we’ll talk about the biological clocks that tick inside us. Clifford Saper of the Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center in Boston will explain some of the research on circadian rhythm and will share his theory about the best way to deal with the disruption of the biological clock caused by jet travel. If you’re traveling this holiday season, or anytime in the near future, give a listen. (Begins at 3:14)

Do you have a tendency to overeat during the holidays? A new study finds that exercise affects the release of two hormones that help regulate appetite, ghrelin and peptide YY. This may help explain why exercise is often, even if only briefly, associated with suppression of appetite. David Stensel of Loughborough University in the United Kingdom will talk about his study, which appears in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. (Begins at 11:54)

Total Time: 20:27


Direct download: Episode_16_Circadian_Rhythm__Jet_Lag_Exercise__Appetite.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:43am EDT

Episode 15: Can Turkey Make You Sleepy?

Why do we feel sleepy after a big Thanksgiving meal? Is there something in the turkey? Are cranberries good for our kidneys? These are some of the questions our experts will explore. Chris I. Cheeseman of the University of Alberta will talk about tryptophan in turkey. (Begins at 3:17.) L. Lee Hamm of Tulane University School of Medicine will discuss what the research shows about cranberries and kidney health. (Begins at 8:58)

Kevin Heffernan (13:26) will talk about his study, aimed at trying to uncover why African-American men have a higher rate of hypertension than white men. The research team from the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, found some early signs of vascular damage in young, healthy African-American men and found that measuring central blood pressure may be a better way of identifying those at risk.

Physiology in the News: (1:25)

Reservatrol
Beta agonist drugs
Mussels

Total time: 21:13

Direct download: Episode_15__Can_Turkey_Make_You_Sleepy_.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:08pm EDT

Episode 14: Halloween Science

Halloween is the theme for October, so we'll talk about sleep paralysis, a condition that has been associated with stories of demon attacks during the night. We'll talk to Allan Cheyne of the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Canada about this spooky phenomenon. (Begins at 3:46)

We'll also talk to Alexandra Shapiro and Phillip Scarpace of the University of Florida in Gainesville about their study on fructose-induced leptin resistance and obesity. This study is a bit scary if you have a sweet tooth. The study appears in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. (Begins at 11:40)

Buzz in Physiology: What is a 'Halloween" gene and how did it get its name? Lawrence I. Gilbert explains. And Bret H. Goodpaster will discuss his study that found that older people who diet without exercising lose more lean muscle mass than those who exercise without dieting. The study is important because older people tend to lose muscle mass as they age, and too much muscle loss may interfere with activities of daily living. (Begins at 1:46)

Total time: (23:06)

Direct download: Episode_14__Halloween_Science.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:34pm EDT

Episode 13: Is Quercetin a Flu Fighter?

Mice are less susceptible to the flu when they eat quercetin, a substance that occurs in fruits and vegetables. Researcher J. Mark Davis will talk about his study on stressful exercise, quercetin and the flu. Click here for the study. (Begins at 3:55)

In the wake of the summer Olympics, we asked Rick Lieber, of the University of California San Diego and the VA Medical Center San Diego, if the muscles of highly trained athletes could get much stronger and whether gene therapy, which is being developed for medical applications, could be used by to enhance performance in the future. (Begins at 12:56)

The Buzz in Physiology gives a quick look at a study that finds a possible link between your genes and activity level. And we detail a study on the benefits of hydrogen sulfide gas. We also talk to APS member Jim Hicks of the University of California Irvine about his involvement with the film, Wall-E. (Begins at 1:20)

Direct download: Episode_13__Is_Quercetin_a_Flu_Fighter_.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:46am EDT

Episode 12: The Brain and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

The Buzz in Physiology: (Starts at 2:01) A quick look at studies from APS journals that have been in the news.

The Accidental Mind: (Starts at 4:17) How is your brain like an ice cream cone? David Linden, author of "The Accidental Mind" explains. Dr. Linden is the editor of the Journal of Neurophysiology and is a researcher and teacher at Johns Hopkins University.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: (Starts at 17:04) Research in sheep shows promise for understanding how maternal drinking causes cerebellar damage to the developing fetus. Timothy Cudd and Jay Ramadoss explain their study, which appears in the American Journal of Physiology. Dr. Cudd is at Texas A&M University, while Dr. Ramadoss is at the University of Wisconsin. Click here for the study. The link brings you to the abstract. Click on "Full Text (PDF)" in the right column for the full study.

Related Press Releases:

EPO
Young at Heart
FinnTwin

The music that you hear at the beginning and end of the program is Body Notes, composed by scientist-musician (and APS member) Hector Rasgado-Flores. The San Diego Chamber Orchestra performs.

Running Time: 27:40

Direct download: Episode_12_The_Brain_and_Fetal_Alcohol_Syndrome.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:26pm EDT

Episode 11: Athletic Performance and Caffeine

The Buzz in Physiology: (Begins at 1:34) A quick look at studies from APS journals that have been in the news.

Athletic Performance and Caffeine: (Begins at 3:05) Taking caffeine and carbohydrates together following exercise refuels the muscles more rapidly, according to a study from the Journal of Applied Physiology done by Australian researcher John Hawley of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia.

Drinking It In: (Begins at 12:55) The discovery of how sugar is absorbed into the small intestine led to oral rehydration therapy and the development of rehydrating sports drinks such as Gatorade. A conversation with the man who made that discovery: Stanley Schultz of the University of Texas Medical School.

You can read Dr. Schultz's historical perspectives paper "From a pump handle to oral rehydration therapy: a model of translational research" by clicking here.

The music that you hear at the beginning and end of the program is Body Notes, composed by scientist-musician (and APS member) Hector Rasgado-Flores. The San Diego Chamber Orchestra performs.

Running Time: 24:01

Related Press Releases:

Sweet tooth and GLUT2 Gene
Aging and Caloric Restriction
High-intensity Exercise

Direct download: Episode_11__Athletic_Performance_and_Caffeine.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:00am EDT

Episode 10: Hydrogen Sulfide - What a Gas

Segment 1: What a Gas.  University of Alabama – Birmingham researchers Jeannette Doeller and David Kraus talk about the amazing properties of hydrogen sulfide gas. Although it’s lethal in even minute quantities, our bodies produce it and use it to good effect. Episode 10 graphic courtesy of David Kraus. Begins at 1:15.

Segment 2: Research Progress on Colon Cancer.  John Carethers of the University of California San Diego explains his research findings on colon cancer and the role that the DNA mismatch repair system plays. Begins at 15:24.

Total time: 25:10

Body Notes, the theme music at the beginning and end of the show, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Episode_10__Hydrogen_Sulfide__What_a_Gas.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:01am EDT

Episode 9: Physiology of Marine Animals

Two segments, total time: 25:48. The second segment 14:40.

Segment 1: Warm body, cold heart: Barbara Block of Stanford University talks about her research with the bluefin tuna, one of the few fish species to have a warm body. You can see how marine animals are being tracked by going to www.topp.org.

Segment 2: Longer, deeper: Andreas Fahlman of the University of British Columbia Marine Mammal Research Unit in Vancouver and Global Diving Research in Ontario explains the physiology that allows mammals such as sea lions to dive so much deeper and for such a long time, compared to humans. You can find a video showing the work of Dr. Fahlman and his colleagues at www.marinemammal.org/2007/fahlman.php and more is available at www.marinemammal.org/MMRU/.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Episode_9__Physiology_of_Marine_Animals.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:58pm EDT

Episode 8: World War II Aviation Physiology

Jay B. Dean, a professor at the University of South Florida, discusses the aviation research that physiologists did during World War II. This research helped the Allies win the Air War. Dr. Dean has prepared a presentation on this topic for the Experimental Biology conference taking place in San Diego, April 5-9.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Episode_8__World_War_II_Aviation_Physiology.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Episode 7: Nanoparticles and Disease

This is a re-issue of Episode 7!

Nanoparticles, which are 1,000 times smaller than a bacterium, are being manufactured and incorporated into some commercial products such as cosmetics and clothing. While nanotechnology holds promise, there is little understanding of how these super small particles might affect us if they get inside our bodies.

Two researchers from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine will tell us about their research investigating the role these particles might play in disease. John Lieske will talk about his research on the role one nanoparticle may play in the development of kidney stones. And Virginia Miller will tell us about her work on a nanoparticle that may play a role in hardening of the arteries.

Drs. Lieske and Miller will lead a symposium on this topic at the Experimental Biology Conference on Wednesday, April 8.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Episode_7__Nanoparticles_and_Disease.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:13am EDT

Episode 6: The Mystery of Serotonin & Hypertension

We continue our coverage of Experimental Biology 2008 with an interview with Michigan State University Professor Stephanie W. Watts, who has been investigating whether serotonin plays a role in high blood pressure.

The APS has awarded Dr. Watts the Henry Pickering Bowditch Memorial Award for early-career achievement. The award goes to a scientist younger than 42 years whose accomplishments are original and outstanding. It is the Society's second-highest award.

The theme music that you hear at the beginning and end of the program, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Episode_6__The_Mystery_of_Serotonin__Hypertension_1.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 2:06pm EDT

Episode 5: Research on Heart Hormones and Cancer In this episode of Life Lines, we talk to David Vesely, a professor at the University of South Florida and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa. Dr. Vesely talks about his research investigating the use of heart hormones as a treatment for cancer. He has just finished trials with mice and hopes to begin human trials this year.

Dr. Vesely will present his research during a symposium at the Experimental Biology conference, which will take place in April in San Diego.

The music you hear at the beginning and end of Life Lines is from Body Notes, composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Cardiac_hormone_final.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:04pm EDT

Episode 4: Severe Asthma, Video Games, 'One Physiology'

In this episode, we'll talk to Ronald Sorkness (1:29) about his study on severe asthma that appears in the Journal of Applied Physiology. We'll also ask David Spierer (13:23) whether there might be physiological benefits in playing an interactive video game. And APS President Hannah Carey (21:13) will explain how physiological research can help preserve the health of the planet.

You can find a summary of the asthma study here.


Direct download: Episode_4__Severe_Asthma_Video_Games_One_Physiology.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:11pm EDT

Special Edition: Hillary's Contribution to Physiology

In this special episode of Life Lines, we talk to John West, a professor of medicine at the University of California, who shares his memories of the late Sir Edmund Hillary. West accompanied Hillary to Mount Everest in 1960, helping to uncover how the body acclimatizes to the extremes of altitude.

The music you hear at the beginning and end of Life Lines is from Body Notes, composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

Direct download: Special_Episode__Hillarys_Contribution_to_Physiology.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 8:52am EDT



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